ISRO tests C25 Cryogenic Engine

The following article is based on my own interpretation of the said events and/ or publicly available information. Any material borrowed from published and unpublished sources has been appropriately referenced. I will bear the sole responsibility for anything that is found to have been copied or misappropriated or misrepresented in the following post.

Ritvik Singh, MBA 2016-18, Vinod Gupta School of Management, IIT Kharagpur


Last week, on India’s Republic Day, Indian space agency ISRO gave the country its best gift by successfully testing its most powerful cryogenic engine, code-named C25. It was tested for a duration of 50 seconds at ISRO Propulsion Complex (IPRC) in Mahendragiri. This is the same technology which was used in Saturn V, which carried man to the moon in 1967. By testing an engine this powerful in the first attempt, ISRO has once again demonstrated its ability to work in new areas.

For those who are unfamiliar with this technology, Cryogenics is the study of substances at a temperature as low as 150 degree Celsius and lower. Since Cryogenic engines use liquid Oxygen and liquid Hydrogen as fuels at this temperature, they can be tricky to operate. Thus far, the US, Japan, China, France and Russia are the only countries to have tested Cryogenic engines.

In my opinion, this is a great news for India. Since Russia denied this technology to India under US pressure, it is a huge accomplishment for them to develop such a complex technology. With a powerful C25 backing the GSLV Mark III rocket, India is looking forward to launching its second moon mission – the Chandrayaan 2.

Advertisements

ISRO trying to break records

The following article is based on my own interpretation of the said events and/ or publicly available information. Any material borrowed from published and unpublished sources has been appropriately referenced. I will bear the sole responsibility for anything that is found to have been copied or misappropriated or misrepresented in the following post.

Mohit Bhagchandani, MBA 2016-18, Vinod Gupta School of Management, IIT Kharagpur


The Indian Space Research Organization (ISRO) will try to break the record of Russia who sent 37 satellites into space in one go. ISRO is planning to send 103 satellites on a single rocket in the first week of February. The PSLV (C37) will carry all the 103 satellites, out of which 3 are Indian satellites and others are from rest of the countries, which will be launched from the Satish Dhawan Space Centre in Andra Pradesh. According to Dr. K. Sivan, Director of the Vikram Sarabhai Space Centre (VSSC), Thiruvananthapuram, all the satellites will be separated in different directions from the launch vehicle such that none of them collides with one another and these separated satellites will move at a relative velocity of 1 metre per second. Russia launched 37 satellites simultaneously in 2014 and NASA sent 29 satellites in one go in 2013.

ISRO has done a phenomenal job in the area of space exploration and travel in the past few years because of the Mars Orbiter Mission, Mangalyaan and the low cost associated with it. The space industry of our country will get a boost as we will be earning additional revenue by carrying the satellites of other countries into space. So, if this mission also gets successful, ISRO will once again make its mark on the world and establish the fact that India is slowly getting to the level of developed countries and will provide a genuine threat to them in terms of technological advancement.

References:

http://www.thehindu.com/sci-tech/science/How-ISRO-plans-to-launch-103-satellites-on-a-single-rocket/article17075073.ece

ISRO invents for Siachen soldiers

The following article is based on my own interpretation of the said events. Any material borrowed from published and unpublished sources has been appropriately referenced. I will bear the sole responsibility for anything that is found to have been copied or misappropriated or misrepresented in the following post.

Abhiraman Goud G C L, MBA 2015-17, Vinod Gupta School of Management, IIT Kharagpur

———————————————————————————————————————————————————

To provide warmth from the body numbing temperatures in the Siachen glacier, ISRO has manufactured the world’s lightest material called silica aerogel or ‘blue air’.

It is a well known fact that our soldiers have to face extremely low temperatures here at Siachen and frequently fall victim to the nature’s fury. The presence of this material in the outfit would have saved Lance Naik Hanumanthappa.

This material, with an outstanding thermal resistance, keeps the body warm and also has utility on earth and in outer space as well.

ISRO, after its recent marvel “Mangalyaan”, has gain come up with the world’s lightest material which has multiple utilities. Hope the good work continues.

 

Reference:

http://www.indiatimes.com/news/india/isro-makes-world-s-lightest-material-will-help-siachen-soldiers-keep-warm-in-freezing-temperatures-253801.html