Why Trump is good

The following article is based on my own interpretation of the said events and/ or publicly available information. Any material borrowed from published and unpublished sources has been appropriately referenced. I will bear the sole responsibility for anything that is found to have been copied or misappropriated or misrepresented in the following post.

T R Srinath, MBA 2016-18, Vinod Gupta School of Management, IIT Kharagpur

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A new bill introduced by Democratic Congresswoman Zoe Lofgren proposing changes in the H-1B visa programme seeks to raise the minimum salary under the scheme to $1,30,000 from the current $60,000. The legislation, if passed, could hit Indian and American IT companies which use H-1B visas to hire foreign skilled workers, including Indians.

Even 8th standard social studies textbooks talk about the menace of brain drain. We’ve been taught that brain drain is bad and that the flight of skilled and educated Indians to foreign countries is something that causes harm to the country. Even though they might bring in a little forex, the loss of fine human capital does irreparable harm to the nation’s economy.

That being said, we must welcome this bold move of the Trump government. Nowadays, settling in the US is the only dream of many youngsters. Fantasized by the standard of living in the developed countries, these youngsters dream of settling there. Isn’t that a form of escapism? If your home is dirty, will you abandon it and settle in your neighbour’s house? Or, would you clean it up and live there peacefully? The brave will prefer the latter.

Despite enjoying highly subsidized education at premier institutes like the IITs and IIMs, the talented youth ends up being of little value to the nation’s development. It’s an investment gone waste. If this new policy of Trump can help India retain its skilled workforce in its own land, we can definitely turn India into a place better than the US!

Banning Inebriation

The following article is based on my own interpretation of the said events. Any material borrowed from published and unpublished sources has been appropriately referenced. I will bear the sole responsibility for anything that is found to have been copied or misappropriated or misrepresented in the following post.

Sonal, MBA 2015-17, Vinod Gupta School of Management, IIT Kharagpur

 


Following suit of Gujarat, Nagaland, parts of Manipur and Kerala (banning alcohol in phases since 2014), Bihar banned alcohol sale on 5 April 2016. Country-made alcohol will be totally prohibited in the first phase while the Indian Made Foreign Liquor (IMFL) will be banned six months after in the second phase. Currently there are nearly 6,000 liquor retail shops in the state. The Bihar government now plans to sell foreign liquor through government outlets. For this, the Excise department has initiated the process to acquire land for setting up outlets and the storage for sale of liquor. Earlier, the Bihar State Beverage Corporation Limited (BSBCL) was responsible for the wholesale trade of IMFL earning a maximum of 2% profit on sale price but now with retail shops it will earn 15% more on the Maximum Retail Price (MRP). According to Mr.Mastan , the state Excise and Prohibition minister, Country, spice and locally brewed liquor will be banned in the first phase while IMFL(foreign made liquor)  will be banned after six months in second phase. He added that the new prohibition policy will not place a complete ban on sale of liquor. The state excise department says that there will now be only 656 government owned IMFL retail shops of liquor in the state with maximum 10 in large towns like Patna, Muzaffarpur, Gaya while 4 in smaller towns like Madhubani, Bhagalpur and Darbhanga. Currently there are nearly 6,000 liquor retail shops in the state. These decions have drawn anger from people who are involved in the liquor sale industry amounting to around 4000 crores. As if this was not enough, the sale of toddy has been dragged  into ban as well. Turning this into a political spectacle, the opposition has claimed that many people belonging to the Pasi community have been arrested for selling toddy hence targeting these people belonging to the Scheduled Caste (SC) category for political reasons. Only time will show if this policy bodes well for Bihar or stays behind as a still another political propaganda.

 

 

High Attrition at e-commerce companies

The following article is based on my own interpretation of the said events. Any material borrowed from published and unpublished sources has been appropriately referenced. I will bear the sole responsibility for anything that is found to have been copied or misappropriated or misrepresented in the following post.

Monica Patra, MBA 2015-17, Vinod Gupta School of Management, IIT Kharagpur


 

Along with 100% FDI in market place model forcing e-commerce companies forcing them to restructure, the latest big problem staring at India’s top internet companies is attrition, especially in their senior ranks. Top e-commerce companies, who have been aggressively recruiting top talent with the millions of dollars they have raised, are grappling with an exodus of management-level executives. E-commerce companies in India are growing so rapidly that they haven’t built the fundamental concept of retaining people, especially at the top-level.

At Flipkart, Srivals Kumar recently resigned as general counsel and head legal, the latest in a series of top-level exits at India’s largest e-commerce company this year.

While Flipkart was quick to replace him with Rajinder Sharma, former director and general counsel — South and West Asia, at Samsung, Kumar’s decision to quit Flipkart comes amid an organisational restructuring. At least four other senior executives have quit Flipkart this year, including Mekin Maheshwari as chief people officer; Ravi Vora as chief executive of strategic brands group; Amod Malviya as chief technology officer; and Sameer Nigam as engineering head.

But Flipkart has also been hiring a number of high-profile senior executives, such as former Google executive Punit Soni whom it appointed as its chief product officer.

At Zomato Durga Raghunath recently resigned as senior vice president-growth after a six-month stint to found an online publishing company, joining a list of senior executives who have quit the venture this year. Namita Gupta, former chief product officer, and Rameet Arora, former chief marketing officer, also quit recently, all having spent less than a year at the Gurgaon-based company.

At Ola Arvind Singhal recently quit as CEO of the company’s TaxiForSure unit, and Swaminathan Seetharaman resigned as vice-president for engineering.

A high attrition rate is not about the compensation that is being offered, but about the job satisfaction these employees don’t get. Companies can always get talent with a high pay package, but retaining them is a different ball game. Many of the top management at e-commerce companies quit to form their own companies.

Reference:

http://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/tech/jobs/Attrition-at-top-level-hurting-e-commerce-companies-in-India/articleshow/49134130.cms?utm_source=TOInewHP_TILwidget&utm_medium=ABtest&utm_campaign=TOInewHP

Need Of Reforms In Indian Education System

The following article is based on my own interpretation of the said events. Any material borrowed from published and unpublished sources has been appropriately referenced. I will bear the sole responsibility for anything that is found to have been copied or misappropriated or misrepresented in the following post.

Prabhat Choudhary, MBA 2015-17, Vinod Gupta School of Management, IIT Kharagpur

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The present Indian education system is established by British and has colonial roots and mindset. It is focused on theoretical knowledge and science and lacks creativity.

The present system ignores holistic development and encourages learning which is passive and emphasizes on cognitive intelligence. The most unfortunate part is its success is measured on parameters of marks. As India stands on 130th position in human development index, it has realized the importance of human capital formation only in 5th decade after independence.

With the problem of brewing educated unemployment and skilled labor force, Indian education system has entangled in paradoxical situation. It is crying for reforms.

As we are clear that reforms is necessary for our current education system, the question is what and how? The Devnani committee recommendations must be accepted to plug the loopholes. The first and foremost thing is to increase the gross enrollment ratio in India. We can map schools in or near villages as long distance from home usually acts deterrent for parents to send their children to school. Kerala has recently achieved the ambitious goal of 100% primary education becoming the first state in country to do so. Moreover, without blindfolding ourselves to merits of education patterns prevalent abroad, we should invite foreign universities to render education in India.

Chinese who realized their traditional thinking was coming in way of modernization sent the nationals outside to countries like Japan, Britain etc. to receive education who later returned to become republicans. However to be cautious, India needs to make it way through GATS (General Agreement on Trade in Services) to ensure that only high quality universities enter the fray and cost of education they provide is controlled.

A man of vision and compassion, Dr. Mahbub-ul-Haq quoted, “You see things that are and ask why? I dream of things that never were and ask why not. We are also in a dire need of such out of box thinking to create society that values multiple intelligence, accepts failures and encourages exploration.

India is globally acknowledged as a knowledge-driven economy. However there is a serious question on such acknowledgement as our education system is wailing for reforms. On a note of optimism by recognizing this need we have already taken a stride in the direction, what we need is persistence to realize this dream and out of box thinking.

 

 

 

Disconnect to Connect: Should it be applicable to Indians?

The following article is based on my own interpretation of the said events. Any material borrowed from published and unpublished sources has been appropriately referenced. I will bear the sole responsibility for anything that is found to have been copied or misappropriated or misrepresented in the following post.

Sidhartha Sankar Nanda, MBA 2015-17, Vinod Gupta School of Management, IIT Kharagpur

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Recently, France’s labour minister, Myriam El Khomri, has decided to pass a law that would give employees the right to ignore professional emails and other messages when outside the office, designed to loosen the more stringent regulations in the country’s labor market. However, the biggest question now is what if this right is given to Indians.

Indians have habit of working from home late hours and also working on weekends is a part and parcel of any executive in India.  Again, in India because of lesser jobs and growing anticipations of proving our worth, there is a rat race for working more.

Not everyone is punctual and dedicated to doing their job as per the deadlines and schedules. Managers mostly have a hard time pushing employees under them to perform as per the demands of time. Laws such as these that call for total disconnecting of work emails after office hours would only bring stress of bosses and managers as employees will have a list of excuses ready for not being able to do the work on time. Work emails at home are usually reminders of an important deadline or guideline that needs to be kept track of. We cannot simply disconnect from our duties of being diligent towards the responsibility endowed upon us. Again mostly, service sector is one of the most dominant sector in India and all IT service providers have international clients and sometime answering calls in midnight help gain trust and enhance long term relationship with the clients. I believe   disconnecting from work seems like a not so suitable idea after all for Indians. In India, it would be extremely difficult to determine if such a rule would be properly implemented even if it is passed. Managers would find some way to connect to their employees if they want to ensure that their message reaches out. However, such rules can always be implemented considering that the pros of its implementation. As every coin has two sides, this law can also help Indians to enhance their social life. In a recent survey it has been found that people who have an imbalance in personal and professional life are more prone to suffering from stress and anxiety related disorders. They are at a high risk of becoming obese and losing appetite resulting in diabetes and heart problems and hence such a law might help Indians to maintain a balance between their work and personal life.

There are already companies in India which have been giving its employees the best work-life balance. In 2015, in the best places to work survey, Google India was toppled by RMSI, a global IT services company which was the number 1 company to work for. Employees now look for a harmonious work culture and that is even more important than high salary package. Godrej Consumer Products, American Express, Google, SAP India are some of the companies which ranked in the top 10 best places to work survey.

Overnight Pink Slips

The following article is based on my own interpretation of the said events. Any material borrowed from published and unpublished sources has been appropriately referenced. I will bear the sole responsibility for anything that is found to have been copied or misappropriated or misrepresented in the following post.

Sachin Mehta, MBA 2015-17, Vinod Gupta School of Management, IIT Kharagpur

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After the TCS, IBM and Morgan Stanley announced lay-offs last year, Yahoo has also joined the list by announcing that they will be cutting down 300 jobs by April 2016. Though, companies tend to say that cutting jobs is a part of their cost cutting measures or a part of their growth and expansion strategy but, with the number of companies issuing pink slips to the large number of employees in the name of cost cuts has raised the questions on job security and stability of the private firms. Even the world’s biggest companies are not shying away from firing their employees.

If the losing jobs wasn’t bad enough, being terminated for ‘under performance’ seems to be like the unkindest cut. Last year IBM unceremoniously fired several of their employees leaving them shattered. Not only the IT companies even banks and telecom companies are not shying away from ruthless lay-offs.  The people who tend to lose their job as a part of this widely brandished strategy of getting rid of redundant employees plays a negative impact on the employees. These professionals have family and mortgages to take care of. Moreover the employees have a feeling of desolation despite they know that once they are fired there is nothing that they can do about it. The psychological impact on the professionals and the trauma their family undergoes is immense.

But, on the other hand issuing of pink slips by well established firms has proved to be blessings for the new organizations that are relatively in their initial phase of development. The exit triggered from the recent layoffs has created a pool of top notch talent for the start-ups to hire from. With so many organisations laying off their employees, the supply of job opportunities for such people is going to far outstrip the demand.

When the biggest companies are not afraid of firing their employees as per their convenience, this throws a vital question: Why can’t these companies provide a cushion for their employees against the fluctuations in the business and profit? It seems as if job security has become an obsolete concept because most of the companies are thriving hard to stay in this competitive environment where no one can be sure of the fact that their jobs won’t be wiped out.

Analytics, Big Data to see robust hiring, high pay packets

The following article is based on my own interpretation of the said events. Any material borrowed from published and unpublished sources has been appropriately referenced. I will bear the sole responsibility for anything that is found to have been copied or misappropriated or misrepresented in the following post.

Mudit Singhal, MBA 2015-17, Vinod Gupta School of Management, IIT Kharagpur

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“This is one of the most exciting times to be alive for data science professionals. We are standing at an inflection point in history, after which analytics and data science will become an integral part of any product or service available,” said Kunal Jain, Founder & CEO of Analytics Vidhya.

As per the Analytics and Big Data Salary Report 2016, Indian startups are willing to shell out above Rs 10.8 LPA as compared to large firms where salaries stand around Rs 9.6 LPA. Both these sectors have witnessed consistent growth over the last five years despite global outlook being increasingly uncertain. Analysts get the maximum salary jump post 5 years of industry experience, with raise in salary as high as 70%, says another report.

The supply of human capital has failed to meet the demands of the industry which is clearly reflected by the competitive pay scales. Looking at the rate at which data is being generated, the demand for data scientists is only going to be on rise in future.

The present scenario only shows a bright future for Analysts and Big Data professionals as both these sectors are going to see tremendous hiring and fat pay packages as companies look forward to attract the best of the talent.

References

http://economictimes.indiatimes.com/articleshow/51105814.cms